Test online preparazione IELTS

/18
1 voti, 5 media
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Test simulazione esame IELTS

Questo test ti darà una valutazione alquanto accurata del tuo livello attuale di inglese nella prospettiva di un esame IELTS. Comprende attività di lettura e ascolto, che offrono un concreto parametro di riferimento dell'esame reale. Hai 40 minuti per completare il test. Dovrebbe essere un tempo più che sufficiente. Non impiegarne di più. Inoltre non dovresti ascoltare la traccia più di una volta, poiché questo è in linea con lo standard ufficiale IELTS. Se hai bisogno di un test più completo che includa conversazione e scrittura, inviaci un'e-mail a info@brtschool.co.uk per ulteriori informazioni.

This test will give you a fairly accurate assessment of your current level in terms of the IELTS exam. There are reading and listening activities which provide a sample of the real examination. You have 40 minutes to complete the test which should be more than enough. Do not take any longer nor should you listen to the track more than once as this is in line with the official IELTS format. If you need a more comprehensive test including Speaking and Writing, send us an email at info@brtschool.co.uk for further information. Good luck or Break a leg (American English)😉

1 / 18

Inglese B2 British School of English

Read the text and answer the question below.

We should have no illusions about this. While some of us may prefer to forget history or to rewrite history to serve some present purpose, the facts of the past, as distinct from the record or perception of the past, cannot be changed. And the consequences of those facts cannot be averted by either ignorance or misrepresentation, whatever its motives.

 

What is the main point that the writer makes in the paragraph?

2 / 18

Inglese B2 British School of English

Read the text and answer the question below.

We live in an age when immense energies and resources are devoted to the falsification of the past, and it is therefore all the more important, in those places where the past can be researched and discussed freely and objectively, to carry out this work to the limit of our abilities. It has been argued that complete objectivity is impossible, since scholars are human beings, with their own loyalties and biases. This is no doubt true, but does not affect the issue. To borrow an analogy, any surgeon will admit that complete asepsis - that is, conditions in which there is absolutely no risk of infection - is also impossible, but one does not, for that reason, perform surgery in a sewer. There is no need to write or teach history in an intellectual sewer either.

According to the paragraph below, surgeons and historians should

3 / 18

Inglese B2 British School of English

Choose the correct heading for the paragraph below.

What is personality?

We are all familiar with the idea that different people have different personalities, but what does this actually mean? It implies that different people behave in different ways, s but it must be more than that. After all, different people find themselves in different circumstances, and much of their behaviour follows from this fact. However, our common experience reveals that different people respond in quite remarkably different ways even when faced with roughly the same circumstances. Alan might be happy to live alone in a quiet and orderly cottage, go out once a week, and stay in the same job for thirty years, whilst Beth likes nothing better than exotic travel and being surrounded by vivacious friends and loud music.

Choose the correct heading for paragraph above  from the list below.

4 / 18

Inglese B2 British School of English

Choose the correct heading for the paragraph below.

What is personality?

In cases like these, we feel that it cannot be just the situation which is producing the differences in behaviour. Something about the way the person is 'wired up' seems to be at work, determining how they react to situations, and, more than that, the kind of situations they get themselves into in the first place. This is why personality seems to become stronger as we get older; when we are young, our situation reflects external factors such as the social and family environment we were born into. As we grow older, we are more and more affected by the consequences of our own choices (doing jobs that we were drawn to, surrounded by people like us whom we have sought out). Thus, personality differences that might have been very slight at birth become dramatic in later adulthood.

Choose the correct heading for paragraph above  from the list below.

5 / 18

Inglese B2 British School of EnglishAnswer these questions.  Choose the correct

Choose the correct heading for the paragraph below.

What is personality?

Personality, then, seems to be the set of enduring as and stable dispositions that characterise a person. These dispositions come partly from the expression of inherent features of the nervous system, and partly from learning. Researchers sometimes distinguish between temperament, which refers exclusively to characteristics that are inborn or directly caused by biological factors, and personality, which also includes social and cultural learning. Nervousness, for example, might be a factor of temperament, but religious piety is an aspect of personality.

Choose the correct heading for paragraph above  from the list below.

6 / 18

Inglese B2 British School of English

Choose the correct heading for the paragraph below.

What is personality?

The discovery that temperamental differences are real is one of the major findings of contemporary psychology. It could easily have been the case that there were no intrinsic differences between people in temperament, so that given the so same learning history, the same dilemmas, they would all respond in much the same way. Yet we now know that this is not the case.

Choose the correct heading for paragraph above  from the list below.

7 / 18

Read the text and choose the YES if there is evidence of the statement in the text, NO if the evidence is contrary to the statement or NOT GIVEN if there is no information provided in the text. 

Nature/Nurture: An Artificial Division?

Often in the news, we see stories asking the question, 'Is this due to nature or nurture?' Certain diseases, traits, and behaviours are said to be 'genetic', while others are due to 'environment'.

There is no doubt that specific genes cause particular problems in certain cases. Parkinson's Disease and colour blindness both run in families because of their genetic origins. But the news reports we see cover a much wider subject area. We wonder if some people have 'natural' talent in music or sports without which any training they receive is useless. Some people assert that children living with, a adults given to certain controversial behaviours will gain those ways from 'environmental influences'. The implication is always that behaviour is either genetic or environmental.

The concept of dividing everything into these two mutually exclusive groups is not the right way to think about diseases or ~ behaviours, because genes and environment are not independent. They influence each other greatly, and their effects can almost never be disentangled.

A creature's genes will in general cause it to seek certain environments and avoid others. That environment then influences the creature's development, and plays a role in whether or not its genes are passed on. Wild dogs, for example, live in packs because their genes tell them to organise that way socially. However, the pack is also where each dog learns proper dog behaviour, practises the skills to survive, and ultimately finds a mate. The pack - the dog's environment - is what makes it into a successful dog with a good chance of passing its genes on. So a well socialised, successful pack dog is the result of both genes and environment.

Humans are also social creatures. We seek other humans to live with, and, in general, do not like to be alone for long periods. Newborn babies respond favourably with lower heart and respiration rates to having people nearby. So we are 'naturally' driven to live in social groups, and these very social groups provide the environment that we need to become successful humans. Genes and environment work together.

In contrast, the environment can also influence which genes are expressed in a creature, and to what degree. Every organism has a unique genetic code. But a given set of genes doesn't determine exactly how a creature will be physically; instead, there is a range of possibilities. The environment plays a major role in determining how the genes will be expressed.

A simple example is the fact that height, a largely inherited trait, has been steadily increasing in humans over the past few centuries. Presumably this is due to better nutrition, since it is too short a time span for evolutionary changes to have occurred. So your height is a combination of your genes and various external factors.

A more complicated example involves brain development. Rats who live in dark, crowded, dirty cages grow fewer neural connections than rats raised in spacious cages with toys and varied diets. The disadvantaged rats learn more slowly and perform more poorly on memory tests, although the rats were related genetically. It is always dangerous to extrapolate from animals to humans, so I won't draw any sweeping conclusions, but at the very least, this experiment shows that environmental factors can produce very different outcomes from similar genetic materials.

So by changing purely external factors, we can influence which genes are expressed and to what degree. Your behaviour, likes and dislikes, and way of thinking are an inseparable combination of your genes and the experiences you have had growing up.

The genetic and environmental factors in a creature's life mutually influence each other and, except in a few very specific cases, cannot be separated or considered in isolation.

In summary, the nature/nurture debate is outdated. We now realise that the either/or choice is too simple, and continuing to think in that way will restrict our understanding of humans and limit our ability to solve the problems we face today. Next time you see a news story asking if something is 'genetic' or 'environmental', you will know the real answer is - both.

The effects of genetic and environmental factors can usually be distinguished.

8 / 18

Read the text and choose the YES if there is evidence of the statement in the text, NO if the evidence is contrary to the statement or NOT GIVEN if there is no information provided in the text. 

Nature/Nurture: An Artificial Division?

Often in the news, we see stories asking the question, 'Is this due to nature or nurture?' Certain diseases, traits, and behaviours are said to be 'genetic', while others are due to 'environment'.

There is no doubt that specific genes cause particular problems in certain cases. Parkinson's Disease and colour blindness both run in families because of their genetic origins. But the news reports we see cover a much wider subject area. We wonder if some people have 'natural' talent in music or sports without which any training they receive is useless. Some people assert that children living with, a adults given to certain controversial behaviours will gain those ways from 'environmental influences'. The implication is always that behaviour is either genetic or environmental.

The concept of dividing everything into these two mutually exclusive groups is not the right way to think about diseases or ~ behaviours, because genes and environment are not independent. They influence each other greatly, and their effects can almost never be disentangled.

A creature's genes will in general cause it to seek certain environments and avoid others. That environment then influences the creature's development, and plays a role in whether or not its genes are passed on. Wild dogs, for example, live in packs because their genes tell them to organise that way socially. However, the pack is also where each dog learns proper dog behaviour, practises the skills to survive, and ultimately finds a mate. The pack - the dog's environment - is what makes it into a successful dog with a good chance of passing its genes on. So a well socialised, successful pack dog is the result of both genes and environment.

Humans are also social creatures. We seek other humans to live with, and, in general, do not like to be alone for long periods. Newborn babies respond favourably with lower heart and respiration rates to having people nearby. So we are 'naturally' driven to live in social groups, and these very social groups provide the environment that we need to become successful humans. Genes and environment work together.

In contrast, the environment can also influence which genes are expressed in a creature, and to what degree. Every organism has a unique genetic code. But a given set of genes doesn't determine exactly how a creature will be physically; instead, there is a range of possibilities. The environment plays a major role in determining how the genes will be expressed.

A simple example is the fact that height, a largely inherited trait, has been steadily increasing in humans over the past few centuries. Presumably this is due to better nutrition, since it is too short a time span for evolutionary changes to have occurred. So your height is a combination of your genes and various external factors.

A more complicated example involves brain development. Rats who live in dark, crowded, dirty cages grow fewer neural connections than rats raised in spacious cages with toys and varied diets. The disadvantaged rats learn more slowly and perform more poorly on memory tests, although the rats were related genetically. It is always dangerous to extrapolate from animals to humans, so I won't draw any sweeping conclusions, but at the very least, this experiment shows that environmental factors can produce very different outcomes from similar genetic materials.

So by changing purely external factors, we can influence which genes are expressed and to what degree. Your behaviour, likes and dislikes, and way of thinking are an inseparable combination of your genes and the experiences you have had growing up.

The genetic and environmental factors in a creature's life mutually influence each other and, except in a few very specific cases, cannot be separated or considered in isolation.

In summary, the nature/nurture debate is outdated. We now realise that the either/or choice is too simple, and continuing to think in that way will restrict our understanding of humans and limit our ability to solve the problems we face today. Next time you see a news story asking if something is 'genetic' or 'environmental', you will know the real answer is - both.

The claim that human beings need to live in groups is supported by the behaviour of newborn babies.

9 / 18

Read the text and choose the YES if there is evidence of the statement in the text, NO if the evidence is contrary to the statement or NOT GIVEN if there is no information provided in the text. 

Nature/Nurture: An Artificial Division?

Often in the news, we see stories asking the question, 'Is this due to nature or nurture?' Certain diseases, traits, and behaviours are said to be 'genetic', while others are due to 'environment'.

There is no doubt that specific genes cause particular problems in certain cases. Parkinson's Disease and colour blindness both run in families because of their genetic origins. But the news reports we see cover a much wider subject area. We wonder if some people have 'natural' talent in music or sports without which any training they receive is useless. Some people assert that children living with, a adults given to certain controversial behaviours will gain those ways from 'environmental influences'. The implication is always that behaviour is either genetic or environmental.

The concept of dividing everything into these two mutually exclusive groups is not the right way to think about diseases or ~ behaviours, because genes and environment are not independent. They influence each other greatly, and their effects can almost never be disentangled.

A creature's genes will in general cause it to seek certain environments and avoid others. That environment then influences the creature's development, and plays a role in whether or not its genes are passed on. Wild dogs, for example, live in packs because their genes tell them to organise that way socially. However, the pack is also where each dog learns proper dog behaviour, practises the skills to survive, and ultimately finds a mate. The pack - the dog's environment - is what makes it into a successful dog with a good chance of passing its genes on. So a well socialised, successful pack dog is the result of both genes and environment.

Humans are also social creatures. We seek other humans to live with, and, in general, do not like to be alone for long periods. Newborn babies respond favourably with lower heart and respiration rates to having people nearby. So we are 'naturally' driven to live in social groups, and these very social groups provide the environment that we need to become successful humans. Genes and environment work together.

In contrast, the environment can also influence which genes are expressed in a creature, and to what degree. Every organism has a unique genetic code. But a given set of genes doesn't determine exactly how a creature will be physically; instead, there is a range of possibilities. The environment plays a major role in determining how the genes will be expressed.

A simple example is the fact that height, a largely inherited trait, has been steadily increasing in humans over the past few centuries. Presumably this is due to better nutrition, since it is too short a time span for evolutionary changes to have occurred. So your height is a combination of your genes and various external factors.

A more complicated example involves brain development. Rats who live in dark, crowded, dirty cages grow fewer neural connections than rats raised in spacious cages with toys and varied diets. The disadvantaged rats learn more slowly and perform more poorly on memory tests, although the rats were related genetically. It is always dangerous to extrapolate from animals to humans, so I won't draw any sweeping conclusions, but at the very least, this experiment shows that environmental factors can produce very different outcomes from similar genetic materials.

So by changing purely external factors, we can influence which genes are expressed and to what degree. Your behaviour, likes and dislikes, and way of thinking are an inseparable combination of your genes and the experiences you have had growing up.

The genetic and environmental factors in a creature's life mutually influence each other and, except in a few very specific cases, cannot be separated or considered in isolation.

In summary, the nature/nurture debate is outdated. We now realise that the either/or choice is too simple, and continuing to think in that way will restrict our understanding of humans and limit our ability to solve the problems we face today. Next time you see a news story asking if something is 'genetic' or 'environmental', you will know the real answer is - both.

A person's height has a purely genetic cause.

10 / 18

Read the text and choose the YES if there is evidence of the statement in the text, NO if the evidence is contrary to the statement or NOT GIVEN if there is no information provided in the text. 

Nature/Nurture: An Artificial Division?

Often in the news, we see stories asking the question, 'Is this due to nature or nurture?' Certain diseases, traits, and behaviours are said to be 'genetic', while others are due to 'environment'.

There is no doubt that specific genes cause particular problems in certain cases. Parkinson's Disease and colour blindness both run in families because of their genetic origins. But the news reports we see cover a much wider subject area. We wonder if some people have 'natural' talent in music or sports without which any training they receive is useless. Some people assert that children living with, a adults given to certain controversial behaviours will gain those ways from 'environmental influences'. The implication is always that behaviour is either genetic or environmental.

The concept of dividing everything into these two mutually exclusive groups is not the right way to think about diseases or ~ behaviours, because genes and environment are not independent. They influence each other greatly, and their effects can almost never be disentangled.

A creature's genes will in general cause it to seek certain environments and avoid others. That environment then influences the creature's development, and plays a role in whether or not its genes are passed on. Wild dogs, for example, live in packs because their genes tell them to organise that way socially. However, the pack is also where each dog learns proper dog behaviour, practises the skills to survive, and ultimately finds a mate. The pack - the dog's environment - is what makes it into a successful dog with a good chance of passing its genes on. So a well socialised, successful pack dog is the result of both genes and environment.

Humans are also social creatures. We seek other humans to live with, and, in general, do not like to be alone for long periods. Newborn babies respond favourably with lower heart and respiration rates to having people nearby. So we are 'naturally' driven to live in social groups, and these very social groups provide the environment that we need to become successful humans. Genes and environment work together.

In contrast, the environment can also influence which genes are expressed in a creature, and to what degree. Every organism has a unique genetic code. But a given set of genes doesn't determine exactly how a creature will be physically; instead, there is a range of possibilities. The environment plays a major role in determining how the genes will be expressed.

A simple example is the fact that height, a largely inherited trait, has been steadily increasing in humans over the past few centuries. Presumably this is due to better nutrition, since it is too short a time span for evolutionary changes to have occurred. So your height is a combination of your genes and various external factors.

A more complicated example involves brain development. Rats who live in dark, crowded, dirty cages grow fewer neural connections than rats raised in spacious cages with toys and varied diets. The disadvantaged rats learn more slowly and perform more poorly on memory tests, although the rats were related genetically. It is always dangerous to extrapolate from animals to humans, so I won't draw any sweeping conclusions, but at the very least, this experiment shows that environmental factors can produce very different outcomes from similar genetic materials.

So by changing purely external factors, we can influence which genes are expressed and to what degree. Your behaviour, likes and dislikes, and way of thinking are an inseparable combination of your genes and the experiences you have had growing up.

The genetic and environmental factors in a creature's life mutually influence each other and, except in a few very specific cases, cannot be separated or considered in isolation.

In summary, the nature/nurture debate is outdated. We now realise that the either/or choice is too simple, and continuing to think in that way will restrict our understanding of humans and limit our ability to solve the problems we face today. Next time you see a news story asking if something is 'genetic' or 'environmental', you will know the real answer is - both.

Living conditions affect the brain development" of people more than of rats.

11 / 18

You are going to hear a conversation between a Scottish student called John and a Finnish student called Pirkko about the Tampere Student Games in Finland. Listen to the conversation and fill in the missing information.

Student Games Information 

Starting date of the games is __________.

12 / 18

You are going to hear a conversation between a Scottish student called John and a Finnish student called Pirkko about the Tampere Student Games in Finland. Listen to the conversation and fill in the missing information.

Student Games Information 

Ending date of the games is __________.

 

13 / 18

You are going to hear a conversation between a Scottish student called John and a Finnish student called Pirkko about the Tampere Student Games in Finland. Listen to the conversation and fill in the missing information.

Student Games Information 

Cost for taking part per day is __________.

 

14 / 18

You are going to hear a conversation between a Scottish student called John and a Finnish student called Pirkko about the Tampere Student Games in Finland. Listen to the conversation and fill in the missing information.

Student Games Information 

It includes competition entrance, meals and __________.

 

 

15 / 18

You are going to hear a conversation between a Scottish student called John and a Finnish student called Pirkko about the Tampere Student Games in Finland. Listen to the conversation and fill in the missing information.

Student Games Information 

Website address __________.

16 / 18

Choose your answers from the options provided.

According to the lecturer, what impact on society did the Irish potato famine have?

17 / 18

Choose your answers from the options provided.

According to the lecturer, what impact on society did the immigration to the UK by French Protestants have?

18 / 18

Choose your answers from the options provided.

According to the lecturer, what impact on society did the immigration to the UK from Asia have?

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