Test online valutazione esame First Certificate (FCE)

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Creato il Da Robert Islam

First Certificate Assessment Test

Fai questo test per scoprire il tuo livello. In particolare potrai verificare il tuo grado di Reading/Comprehension, Grammar&Vocabulary e Listening. Il risultato minimo per superarlo è 60%. Una volta terminato il test, ti verrà inviata un'e-mail con il risultato.

Do this test to find out your level. It tests Reading/Comprehension, Grammar&Vocabulary and Listening. You need 60% to pass this test. An email will be sent to you with the result when you finish the test.

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1 / 45

1. Read the text below and decide which answer (A, B, C or D) best fits each gap.

 

The oldest leather shoe in the world

Archaeologists (1) _____ that a perfectly preserved 5,500-year-old shoe has been discovered in a cave in Armenia in south-west Asia. It is (2) _____ to be the oldest leather shoe ever found. The shoe was made of a single piece of leather, stitched at the front and back, and was shaped to fit the wearer’s foot. It had been (3) _____ with grasses, either for warmth or to make sure it kept its shape. ‘The shoe is relatively small but we can’t say for (4) _____ whether it was worn by a man or a woman,’ says Dr Ron Pinhasi, an archaeologist on the research (5) _____ ‘We thought at first that it was about 600-700 years old because it was in such good shape.’

2 / 45

2. Read the text below and decide which answer (A, B, C or D) best fits each gap.

 

The oldest leather shoe in the world

Archaeologists (1) _____ that a perfectly preserved 5,500-year-old shoe has been discovered in a cave in Armenia in south-west Asia. It is (2) _____ to be the oldest leather shoe ever found. The shoe was made of a single piece of leather, stitched at the front and back, and was shaped to fit the wearer’s foot. It had been (3) _____ with grasses, either for warmth or to make sure it kept its shape. ‘The shoe is relatively small but we can’t say for (4) _____ whether it was worn by a man or a woman,’ says Dr Ron Pinhasi, an archaeologist on the research (5) _____ ‘We thought at first that it was about 600-700 years old because it was in such good shape.’

3 / 45

3. Read the text below and decide which answer (A, B, C or D) best fits each gap.

 

The oldest leather shoe in the world

Archaeologists (1) _____ that a perfectly preserved 5,500-year-old shoe has been discovered in a cave in Armenia in south-west Asia. It is (2) _____ to be the oldest leather shoe ever found. The shoe was made of a single piece of leather, stitched at the front and back, and was shaped to fit the wearer’s foot. It had been (3) _____ with grasses, either for warmth or to make sure it kept its shape. ‘The shoe is relatively small but we can’t say for (4) _____ whether it was worn by a man or a woman,’ says Dr Ron Pinhasi, an archaeologist on the research (5) _____ ‘We thought at first that it was about 600-700 years old because it was in such good shape.’

4 / 45

4. Read the text below and decide which answer (A, B, C or D) best fits each gap.

 

The oldest leather shoe in the world

Archaeologists (1) _____ that a perfectly preserved 5,500-year-old shoe has been discovered in a cave in Armenia in south-west Asia. It is (2) _____ to be the oldest leather shoe ever found. The shoe was made of a single piece of leather, stitched at the front and back, and was shaped to fit the wearer’s foot. It had been (3) _____ with grasses, either for warmth or to make sure it kept its shape. ‘The shoe is relatively small but we can’t say for (4) _____ whether it was worn by a man or a woman,’ says Dr Ron Pinhasi, an archaeologist on the research (5) _____ ‘We thought at first that it was about 600-700 years old because it was in such good shape.’

5 / 45

5. Read the text below and decide which answer (A, B, C or D) best fits each gap.

 

The oldest leather shoe in the world

Archaeologists (1) _____ that a perfectly preserved 5,500-year-old shoe has been discovered in a cave in Armenia in south-west Asia. It is (2) _____ to be the oldest leather shoe ever found. The shoe was made of a single piece of leather, stitched at the front and back, and was shaped to fit the wearer’s foot. It had been (3) _____ with grasses, either for warmth or to make sure it kept its shape. ‘The shoe is relatively small but we can’t say for (4) _____ whether it was worn by a man or a woman,’ says Dr Ron Pinhasi, an archaeologist on the research (5) _____ ‘We thought at first that it was about 600-700 years old because it was in such good shape.’

6 / 45

6. Read the text below and think of the word which best fits the gap.

From black pepper to chilli pepper

In the 15th century, Europeans knew nothing of the chilli pepper, but they held black pepper in high regard and had used it in cooking (6) _____ Greek and Roman times. Ships travelling east brought the black pepper from the Spice Islands in South East Asia but this (7) _____ a long time. In 1492, Christopher Columbus was asked to find a shorter route to the Spice Islands, going westwards (8) _____ than eastwards, and so he set (9) _____ from Spain across the Atlantic Ocean.

Columbus didn’t succeed (10) _____ finding the Spice Islands but he (11) _____ manage to reach the Americas. There he (12) _____ across another pepper; the chilli, which had been used in cooking in South America for thousands of years. Soon (13) _____ Columbus’s voyage, large quantities of chillies were being shipped back to Spain from the Caribbean. Later, people realised that chillies would actually grow in southern Europe and it wasn’t long before fresh chillies were (14) _____ sale in European markets.

7 / 45

7. Read the text below and think of the word which best fits the gap.

From black pepper to chilli pepper

In the 15th century, Europeans knew nothing of the chilli pepper, but they held black pepper in high regard and had used it in cooking (6) _____ Greek and Roman times. Ships travelling east brought the black pepper from the Spice Islands in South East Asia but this (7) _____ a long time. In 1492, Christopher Columbus was asked to find a shorter route to the Spice Islands, going westwards (8) _____ than eastwards, and so he set (9) _____ from Spain across the Atlantic Ocean.

Columbus didn’t succeed (10) _____ finding the Spice Islands but he (11) _____ manage to reach the Americas. There he (12) _____ across another pepper; the chilli, which had been used in cooking in South America for thousands of years. Soon (13) _____ Columbus’s voyage, large quantities of chillies were being shipped back to Spain from the Caribbean. Later, people realised that chillies would actually grow in southern Europe and it wasn’t long before fresh chillies were (14) _____ sale in European markets.

8 / 45

8. Read the text below and think of the word which best the gap.

From black pepper to chilli pepper

In the 15th century, Europeans knew nothing of the chilli pepper, but they held black pepper in high regard and had used it in cooking (6) _____ Greek and Roman times. Ships travelling east brought the black pepper from the Spice Islands in South East Asia but this (7) _____ a long time. In 1492, Christopher Columbus was asked to find a shorter route to the Spice Islands, going westwards (8) _____ than eastwards, and so he set (9) _____ from Spain across the Atlantic Ocean.

Columbus didn’t succeed (10) _____ finding the Spice Islands but he (11) _____ manage to reach the Americas. There he (12) _____ across another pepper; the chilli, which had been used in cooking in South America for thousands of years. Soon (13) _____ Columbus’s voyage, large quantities of chillies were being shipped back to Spain from the Caribbean. Later, people realised that chillies would actually grow in southern Europe and it wasn’t long before fresh chillies were (14) _____ sale in European markets.

9 / 45

9. Read the text below and think of the word which best the gap.

From black pepper to chilli pepper

In the 15th century, Europeans knew nothing of the chilli pepper, but they held black pepper in high regard and had used it in cooking (6) _____ Greek and Roman times. Ships travelling east brought the black pepper from the Spice Islands in South East Asia but this (7) _____ a long time. In 1492, Christopher Columbus was asked to find a shorter route to the Spice Islands, going westwards (8) _____ than eastwards, and so he set (9) _____ from Spain across the Atlantic Ocean.

Columbus didn’t succeed (10) _____ finding the Spice Islands but he (11) _____ manage to reach the Americas. There he (12) _____ across another pepper; the chilli, which had been used in cooking in South America for thousands of years. Soon (13) _____ Columbus’s voyage, large quantities of chillies were being shipped back to Spain from the Caribbean. Later, people realised that chillies would actually grow in southern Europe and it wasn’t long before fresh chillies were (14) _____ sale in European markets.

10 / 45

10. Read the text below and think of the word which best the gap.

From black pepper to chilli pepper

In the 15th century, Europeans knew nothing of the chilli pepper, but they held black pepper in high regard and had used it in cooking (6) _____ Greek and Roman times. Ships travelling east brought the black pepper from the Spice Islands in South East Asia but this (7) _____ a long time. In 1492, Christopher Columbus was asked to find a shorter route to the Spice Islands, going westwards (8) _____ than eastwards, and so he set (9) _____ from Spain across the Atlantic Ocean.

Columbus didn’t succeed (10) _____ finding the Spice Islands but he (11) _____ manage to reach the Americas. There he (12) _____ across another pepper; the chilli, which had been used in cooking in South America for thousands of years. Soon (13) _____ Columbus’s voyage, large quantities of chillies were being shipped back to Spain from the Caribbean. Later, people realised that chillies would actually grow in southern Europe and it wasn’t long before fresh chillies were (14) _____ sale in European markets.

11 / 45

11. Read the text below and think of the word which best the gap.

From black pepper to chilli pepper

In the 15th century, Europeans knew nothing of the chilli pepper, but they held black pepper in high regard and had used it in cooking (6) _____ Greek and Roman times. Ships travelling east brought the black pepper from the Spice Islands in South East Asia but this (7) _____ a long time. In 1492, Christopher Columbus was asked to find a shorter route to the Spice Islands, going westwards (8) _____ than eastwards, and so he set (9) _____ from Spain across the Atlantic Ocean.

Columbus didn’t succeed (10) _____ finding the Spice Islands but he (11) _____ manage to reach the Americas. There he (12) _____ across another pepper; the chilli, which had been used in cooking in South America for thousands of years. Soon (13) _____ Columbus’s voyage, large quantities of chillies were being shipped back to Spain from the Caribbean. Later, people realised that chillies would actually grow in southern Europe and it wasn’t long before fresh chillies were (14) _____ sale in European markets.

12 / 45

12. Read the text below and think of the word which best the gap.

From black pepper to chilli pepper

In the 15th century, Europeans knew nothing of the chilli pepper, but they held black pepper in high regard and had used it in cooking (6) _____ Greek and Roman times. Ships travelling east brought the black pepper from the Spice Islands in South East Asia but this (7) _____ a long time. In 1492, Christopher Columbus was asked to find a shorter route to the Spice Islands, going westwards (8) _____ than eastwards, and so he set (9) _____ from Spain across the Atlantic Ocean.

Columbus didn’t succeed (10) _____ finding the Spice Islands but he (11) _____ manage to reach the Americas. There he (12) _____ across another pepper; the chilli, which had been used in cooking in South America for thousands of years. Soon (13) _____ Columbus’s voyage, large quantities of chillies were being shipped back to Spain from the Caribbean. Later, people realised that chillies would actually grow in southern Europe and it wasn’t long before fresh chillies were (14) _____ sale in European markets.

13 / 45

13. Read the text below and think of the word which best the gap.

From black pepper to chilli pepper

In the 15th century, Europeans knew nothing of the chilli pepper, but they held black pepper in high regard and had used it in cooking (6) _____ Greek and Roman times. Ships travelling east brought the black pepper from the Spice Islands in South East Asia but this (7) _____ a long time. In 1492, Christopher Columbus was asked to find a shorter route to the Spice Islands, going westwards (8) _____ than eastwards, and so he set (9) _____ from Spain across the Atlantic Ocean.

Columbus didn’t succeed (10) _____ finding the Spice Islands but he (11) _____ manage to reach the Americas. There he (12) _____ across another pepper; the chilli, which had been used in cooking in South America for thousands of years. Soon (13) _____ Columbus’s voyage, large quantities of chillies were being shipped back to Spain from the Caribbean. Later, people realised that chillies would actually grow in southern Europe and it wasn’t long before fresh chillies were (14) _____ sale in European markets.

14 / 45

14. Read the text below and think of the word which best the gap.

From black pepper to chilli pepper

In the 15th century, Europeans knew nothing of the chilli pepper, but they held black pepper in high regard and had used it in cooking (6) _____ Greek and Roman times. Ships travelling east brought the black pepper from the Spice Islands in South East Asia but this (7) _____ a long time. In 1492, Christopher Columbus was asked to find a shorter route to the Spice Islands, going westwards (8) _____ than eastwards, and so he set (9) _____ from Spain across the Atlantic Ocean.

Columbus didn’t succeed (10) _____ finding the Spice Islands but he (11) _____ manage to reach the Americas. There he (12) _____ across another pepper; the chilli, which had been used in cooking in South America for thousands of years. Soon (13) _____ Columbus’s voyage, large quantities of chillies were being shipped back to Spain from the Caribbean. Later, people realised that chillies would actually grow in southern Europe and it wasn’t long before fresh chillies were (14) _____ sale in European markets.

15 / 45

15. Use the word given in capitals  to form a word that fits in the gap.

Family bike fun

National Bike Week was celebrated last week in a (15) _____ (MEMORY) way with a Family Fun Day in Larkside Park. The event (16) _____  (PROOF) to be highly successful with over five hundred people attending. Larkside Cycling Club brought along a (17) _____ (VARY) of different bikes to demonstrate the (18) _____ (ENJOY) that family members of all ages can get from group cycling. Basic cycling (19) _____ (SAFE) was taught using conventional bikes. There were also some rather (20) _____ (USUAL) bikes on display. One-wheelers, five-wheelers and even one which could carry up to six (21) _____ (RIDE) , were used for fun.

The club also gave information on how cycling can help to reduce (22) _____ (ENVIRONMENT) damage. They also provided (23) _____ (SUGGEST) as to how people could substitute the bike for the car for daily journeys. The overall message was that cycling is great family fun and an excellent alternative to driving. By the end of the day over a hundred people had signed up for membership.

16 / 45

16. Use the word given in capitals  to form a word that fits in the gap.

Family bike fun

National Bike Week was celebrated last week in a (15) _____ (MEMORY) way with a Family Fun Day in Larkside Park. The event (16) _____  (PROOF) to be highly successful with over five hundred people attending. Larkside Cycling Club brought along a (17) _____ (VARY) of different bikes to demonstrate the (18) _____ (ENJOY) that family members of all ages can get from group cycling. Basic cycling (19) _____ (SAFE) was taught using conventional bikes. There were also some rather (20) _____ (USUAL) bikes on display. One-wheelers, five-wheelers and even one which could carry up to six (21) _____ (RIDE) , were used for fun.

The club also gave information on how cycling can help to reduce (22) _____ (ENVIRONMENT) damage. They also provided (23) _____ (SUGGEST) as to how people could substitute the bike for the car for daily journeys. The overall message was that cycling is great family fun and an excellent alternative to driving. By the end of the day over a hundred people had signed up for membership.

17 / 45

17. Use the word given in capitals  to form a word that fits in the gap.

Family bike fun

National Bike Week was celebrated last week in a (15) _____ (MEMORY) way with a Family Fun Day in Larkside Park. The event (16) _____  (PROOF) to be highly successful with over five hundred people attending. Larkside Cycling Club brought along a (17) _____ (VARY) of different bikes to demonstrate the (18) _____ (ENJOY) that family members of all ages can get from group cycling. Basic cycling (19) _____ (SAFE) was taught using conventional bikes. There were also some rather (20) _____ (USUAL) bikes on display. One-wheelers, five-wheelers and even one which could carry up to six (21) _____ (RIDE) , were used for fun.

The club also gave information on how cycling can help to reduce (22) _____ (ENVIRONMENT) damage. They also provided (23) _____ (SUGGEST) as to how people could substitute the bike for the car for daily journeys. The overall message was that cycling is great family fun and an excellent alternative to driving. By the end of the day over a hundred people had signed up for membership.

18 / 45

18. Use the word given in capitals  to form a word that fits in the gap.

Family bike fun

National Bike Week was celebrated last week in a (15) _____ (MEMORY) way with a Family Fun Day in Larkside Park. The event (16) _____  (PROOF) to be highly successful with over five hundred people attending. Larkside Cycling Club brought along a (17) _____ (VARY) of different bikes to demonstrate the (18) _____ (ENJOY) that family members of all ages can get from group cycling. Basic cycling (19) _____ (SAFE) was taught using conventional bikes. There were also some rather (20) _____ (USUAL) bikes on display. One-wheelers, five-wheelers and even one which could carry up to six (21) _____ (RIDE) , were used for fun.

The club also gave information on how cycling can help to reduce (22) _____ (ENVIRONMENT) damage. They also provided (23) _____ (SUGGEST) as to how people could substitute the bike for the car for daily journeys. The overall message was that cycling is great family fun and an excellent alternative to driving. By the end of the day over a hundred people had signed up for membership.

19 / 45

19. Use the word given in capitals  to form a word that fits in the gap.

Family bike fun

National Bike Week was celebrated last week in a (15) _____ (MEMORY) way with a Family Fun Day in Larkside Park. The event (16) _____  (PROOF) to be highly successful with over five hundred people attending. Larkside Cycling Club brought along a (17) _____ (VARY) of different bikes to demonstrate the (18) _____ (ENJOY) that family members of all ages can get from group cycling. Basic cycling (19) _____ (SAFE) was taught using conventional bikes. There were also some rather (20) _____ (USUAL) bikes on display. One-wheelers, five-wheelers and even one which could carry up to six (21) _____ (RIDE) , were used for fun.

The club also gave information on how cycling can help to reduce (22) _____ (ENVIRONMENT) damage. They also provided (23) _____ (SUGGEST) as to how people could substitute the bike for the car for daily journeys. The overall message was that cycling is great family fun and an excellent alternative to driving. By the end of the day over a hundred people had signed up for membership.

20 / 45

20. Use the word given in capitals  to form a word that fits in the gap.

Family bike fun

National Bike Week was celebrated last week in a (15) _____ (MEMORY) way with a Family Fun Day in Larkside Park. The event (16) _____  (PROOF) to be highly successful with over five hundred people attending. Larkside Cycling Club brought along a (17) _____ (VARY) of different bikes to demonstrate the (18) _____ (ENJOY) that family members of all ages can get from group cycling. Basic cycling (19) _____ (SAFE) was taught using conventional bikes. There were also some rather (20) _____ (USUAL) bikes on display. One-wheelers, five-wheelers and even one which could carry up to six (21) _____ (RIDE) , were used for fun.

The club also gave information on how cycling can help to reduce (22) _____ (ENVIRONMENT) damage. They also provided (23) _____ (SUGGEST) as to how people could substitute the bike for the car for daily journeys. The overall message was that cycling is great family fun and an excellent alternative to driving. By the end of the day over a hundred people had signed up for membership.

21 / 45

21. Use the word given in capitals  to form a word that fits in the gap.

Family bike fun

National Bike Week was celebrated last week in a (15) _____ (MEMORY) way with a Family Fun Day in Larkside Park. The event (16) _____  (PROOF) to be highly successful with over five hundred people attending. Larkside Cycling Club brought along a (17) _____ (VARY) of different bikes to demonstrate the (18) _____ (ENJOY) that family members of all ages can get from group cycling. Basic cycling (19) _____ (SAFE) was taught using conventional bikes. There were also some rather (20) _____ (USUAL) bikes on display. One-wheelers, five-wheelers and even one which could carry up to six (21) _____ (RIDE) , were used for fun.

The club also gave information on how cycling can help to reduce (22) _____ (ENVIRONMENT) damage. They also provided (23) _____ (SUGGEST) as to how people could substitute the bike for the car for daily journeys. The overall message was that cycling is great family fun and an excellent alternative to driving. By the end of the day over a hundred people had signed up for membership.

22 / 45

22. Use the word given in capitals  to form a word that fits in the gap.

Family bike fun

National Bike Week was celebrated last week in a (15) _____ (MEMORY) way with a Family Fun Day in Larkside Park. The event (16) _____  (PROOF) to be highly successful with over five hundred people attending. Larkside Cycling Club brought along a (17) _____ (VARY) of different bikes to demonstrate the (18) _____ (ENJOY) that family members of all ages can get from group cycling. Basic cycling (19) _____ (SAFE) was taught using conventional bikes. There were also some rather (20) _____ (USUAL) bikes on display. One-wheelers, five-wheelers and even one which could carry up to six (21) _____ (RIDE) , were used for fun.

The club also gave information on how cycling can help to reduce (22) _____ (ENVIRONMENT) damage. They also provided (23) _____ (SUGGEST) as to how people could substitute the bike for the car for daily journeys. The overall message was that cycling is great family fun and an excellent alternative to driving. By the end of the day over a hundred people had signed up for membership.

23 / 45

23. Use the word given in capitals  to form a word that fits in the gap.

Family bike fun

National Bike Week was celebrated last week in a (15) _____ (MEMORY) way with a Family Fun Day in Larkside Park. The event (16) _____  (PROOF) to be highly successful with over five hundred people attending. Larkside Cycling Club brought along a (17) _____ (VARY) of different bikes to demonstrate the (18) _____ (ENJOY) that family members of all ages can get from group cycling. Basic cycling (19) _____ (SAFE) was taught using conventional bikes. There were also some rather (20) _____ (USUAL) bikes on display. One-wheelers, five-wheelers and even one which could carry up to six (21) _____ (RIDE) , were used for fun.

The club also gave information on how cycling can help to reduce (22) _____ (ENVIRONMENT) damage. They also provided (23) _____ (SUGGEST) as to how people could substitute the bike for the car for daily journeys. The overall message was that cycling is great family fun and an excellent alternative to driving. By the end of the day over a hundred people had signed up for membership.

24 / 45

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and
five words, including the word given.

 

24. A very friendly taxi driver drove us into town.

DRIVEN

We____________________ a very friendly taxi driver.

25 / 45

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and
five words, including the word given.

Paula can't wait to hear the band's new album.

FORWARD

Paula is really ____________________ the band's new album.

26 / 45

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and
five words, including the word given.

26. Buying a daily newspaper seems pointless to me.

POINT

I can’t ____________________ a daily newspaper.

27 / 45

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and
five words, including the word given.

27. Daniel thought the flight would be more expensive than it actually was.

NOT

The flight ____________________ as Daniel thought it would be.

28 / 45

Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not change the word given. You must use between two and
five words, including the word given.

28. It’s a shame I’m not able to come to your party on Saturday.

COULD

I ____________________ to your party on Saturday.

29 / 45

Kombat Kate

29. James Stanton meets ‘Kombat Kate’ Waters, who trains theatre actors in how to ‘fight’ on stage.

There must be few occasions when it would be really rude to refuse an invitation to head-butt someone
you’ve just met! But I’m in one of those right now. I’m in a rehearsal room in a theatre with a group of
actors, facing up to stage fighting director Kate Waters. I’ve already dragged her around the room and
slapped her on the arm. Now she wants me to head-butt her. But fear not, this is all strictly pretend!

‘Imagine there’s a tin can on my shoulder,’ she says. ‘Now try to knock it off.’ I lower my head as instructed,
then lift it sharply, aiming for the imaginary can, hoping desperately that I don’t miscalculate the angle and
end up doing damage to her face. To my amazement, I get it right. ‘That was good,’ says Waters. ‘Now
maybe try it again without smiling.’

Waters, known in the industry as Kombat Kate, is showing me how actors fight each other without getting
hurt, and that includes sword-fighting. (She inspires fierce devotion: when I tweet that I’m meeting Waters,
one actress friend responds: ‘She’s amazing. She taught me how to be a secret service agent in two days.’)

Perhaps the most famous play Kate has worked on recently was called Noises Off. She taught the cast how to
fall down stairs without breaking any bones. One of the fight scenes is fairly close, Kate tells me, to the one
we’re trying out now. ‘I’ve just slowed it down a bit,’ she says tactfully, before inviting me to throw her
against the wall. I obey, making sure I let go of her quickly, so she can control her own movement. Push your
opponent too hard, and they will hit the wall for real. I watch her hit the wall before falling to the ground.
She’s fine, of course. ‘That’s my party trick,’ she says with a grin. ‘Works every time.’

Once the lesson is over Kate tells me how she became one of only two women on the official register of stage
fight directors. Already a keen martial arts expert from childhood, Kate did drama at university, and one
module of her course introduced her to stage combat. When she made enquiries about the possibility of
teaching it as a career, she was told about the register and the qualifications she’d need to be accepted onto it.
It was no small order: as well as a certificate in advanced stage combat, she would need a black belt in karate
and proficiency in fencing, a sport she’d never tried before.

In the first paragraph, the writer is aware of

30 / 45

Kombat Kate

30. James Stanton meets ‘Kombat Kate’ Waters, who trains theatre actors in how to ‘fight’ on stage.

There must be few occasions when it would be really rude to refuse an invitation to head-butt someone
you’ve just met! But I’m in one of those right now. I’m in a rehearsal room in a theatre with a group of
actors, facing up to stage fighting director Kate Waters. I’ve already dragged her around the room and
slapped her on the arm. Now she wants me to head-butt her. But fear not, this is all strictly pretend!

‘Imagine there’s a tin can on my shoulder,’ she says. ‘Now try to knock it off.’ I lower my head as instructed,
then lift it sharply, aiming for the imaginary can, hoping desperately that I don’t miscalculate the angle and
end up doing damage to her face. To my amazement, I get it right. ‘That was good,’ says Waters. ‘Now
maybe try it again without smiling.’

Waters, known in the industry as Kombat Kate, is showing me how actors fight each other without getting
hurt, and that includes sword-fighting. (She inspires fierce devotion: when I tweet that I’m meeting Waters,
one actress friend responds: ‘She’s amazing. She taught me how to be a secret service agent in two days.’)

Perhaps the most famous play Kate has worked on recently was called Noises Off. She taught the cast how to
fall down stairs without breaking any bones. One of the fight scenes is fairly close, Kate tells me, to the one
we’re trying out now. ‘I’ve just slowed it down a bit,’ she says tactfully, before inviting me to throw her
against the wall. I obey, making sure I let go of her quickly, so she can control her own movement. Push your
opponent too hard, and they will hit the wall for real. I watch her hit the wall before falling to the ground.
She’s fine, of course. ‘That’s my party trick,’ she says with a grin. ‘Works every time.’

Once the lesson is over Kate tells me how she became one of only two women on the official register of stage
fight directors. Already a keen martial arts expert from childhood, Kate did drama at university, and one
module of her course introduced her to stage combat. When she made enquiries about the possibility of
teaching it as a career, she was told about the register and the qualifications she’d need to be accepted onto it.
It was no small order: as well as a certificate in advanced stage combat, she would need a black belt in karate
and proficiency in fencing, a sport she’d never tried before.

 

How does the writer feel when Kate mentions the tin can?

31 / 45

Kombat Kate

31. James Stanton meets ‘Kombat Kate’ Waters, who trains theatre actors in how to ‘fight’ on stage.

There must be few occasions when it would be really rude to refuse an invitation to head-butt someone
you’ve just met! But I’m in one of those right now. I’m in a rehearsal room in a theatre with a group of
actors, facing up to stage fighting director Kate Waters. I’ve already dragged her around the room and
slapped her on the arm. Now she wants me to head-butt her. But fear not, this is all strictly pretend!

‘Imagine there’s a tin can on my shoulder,’ she says. ‘Now try to knock it off.’ I lower my head as instructed,
then lift it sharply, aiming for the imaginary can, hoping desperately that I don’t miscalculate the angle and
end up doing damage to her face. To my amazement, I get it right. ‘That was good,’ says Waters. ‘Now
maybe try it again without smiling.’

Waters, known in the industry as Kombat Kate, is showing me how actors fight each other without getting
hurt, and that includes sword-fighting. (She inspires fierce devotion: when I tweet that I’m meeting Waters,
one actress friend responds: ‘She’s amazing. She taught me how to be a secret service agent in two days.’)

Perhaps the most famous play Kate has worked on recently was called Noises Off. She taught the cast how to
fall down stairs without breaking any bones. One of the fight scenes is fairly close, Kate tells me, to the one
we’re trying out now. ‘I’ve just slowed it down a bit,’ she says tactfully, before inviting me to throw her
against the wall. I obey, making sure I let go of her quickly, so she can control her own movement. Push your
opponent too hard, and they will hit the wall for real. I watch her hit the wall before falling to the ground.
She’s fine, of course. ‘That’s my party trick,’ she says with a grin. ‘Works every time.’

Once the lesson is over Kate tells me how she became one of only two women on the official register of stage
fight directors. Already a keen martial arts expert from childhood, Kate did drama at university, and one
module of her course introduced her to stage combat. When she made enquiries about the possibility of
teaching it as a career, she was told about the register and the qualifications she’d need to be accepted onto it.
It was no small order: as well as a certificate in advanced stage combat, she would need a black belt in karate
and proficiency in fencing, a sport she’d never tried before.

When Kate and the writer repeat the fight scene from Noises Off, we learn that

32 / 45

32. You are going to read a newspaper article about the man who designed the recycling symbol. Three sentences have been removed from the article. Choose from the sentences A – E  the one which fits each gap (32 – 34). There are two extra sentences which you do not need to use.

How the recycling symbol was created

Gary Anderson designed a symbol which we
see everywhere nowadays.

I studied engineering at the University of Southern California at a time when there was a lot of emphasis in the United States on training young people to be engineers. That said, I eventually switched to architecture. I just couldn’t get a grasp on electronics and architecture seemed more concrete to me.

It was around that time that I saw a poster advertising a design competition being run by the Container Corporation of America. The idea was to create a symbol to represent recycled paper. One of my college requirements had been a graphic design course so I thought I’d give it a go. It didn’t take me long to come up
with my design: only a day or two. (32) _____ I already had arrows and angles in my mind because on my course I’d done a presentation on recycling waste water. I’d come up with a graphic that described this process very simply.

The problem with the design I’d done earlier was that it seemed flat, two-dimensional. So when I sat down to enter the competition, I thought back to a field trip in elementary school to a newspaper office where we’d been shown how paper was fed over rollers as it was printed. (33) _____  The three arrows in it look like strips of folded-over paper. I drew them in pencil, and then traced over everything in black ink. These days, with computer graphics packages, it’s rare that designs are quite so plain. I think I found out I’d won the competition in a letter. Was I excited? Well, yes of course – but not that excited. (34) _____  So it just seemed like, of course I would win! There was a monetary prize, though for the life of me I can’t remember how much it was... about $2,000?

33 / 45

33. You are going to read a newspaper article about the man who designed the recycling symbol. Three sentences have been removed from the article. Choose from the sentences A – E  the one which fits each gap (32 – 34). There are two extra sentences which you do not need to use.

How the recycling symbol was created

Gary Anderson designed a symbol which we
see everywhere nowadays.

I studied engineering at the University of Southern California at a time when there was a lot of emphasis in the United States on training young people to be engineers. That said, I eventually switched to architecture. I just couldn’t get a grasp on electronics and architecture seemed more concrete to me.

It was around that time that I saw a poster advertising a design competition being run by the Container Corporation of America. The idea was to create a symbol to represent recycled paper. One of my college requirements had been a graphic design course so I thought I’d give it a go. It didn’t take me long to come up
with my design: only a day or two. (32) _____ I already had arrows and angles in my mind because on my course I’d done a presentation on recycling waste water. I’d come up with a graphic that described this process very simply.

The problem with the design I’d done earlier was that it seemed flat, two-dimensional. So when I sat down to enter the competition, I thought back to a field trip in elementary school to a newspaper office where we’d been shown how paper was fed over rollers as it was printed. (33) _____  The three arrows in it look like strips of folded-over paper. I drew them in pencil, and then traced over everything in black ink. These days, with computer graphics packages, it’s rare that designs are quite so plain. I think I found out I’d won the competition in a letter. Was I excited? Well, yes of course – but not that excited. (34) _____  So it just seemed like, of course I would win! There was a monetary prize, though for the life of me I can’t remember how much it was... about $2,000?

34 / 45

34. You are going to read a newspaper article about the man who designed the recycling symbol. Three sentences have been removed from the article. Choose from the sentences A – E  the one which fits each gap (32 – 34). There are two extra sentences which you do not need to use.

How the recycling symbol was created

Gary Anderson designed a symbol which we
see everywhere nowadays.

I studied engineering at the University of Southern California at a time when there was a lot of emphasis in the United States on training young people to be engineers. That said, I eventually switched to architecture. I just couldn’t get a grasp on electronics and architecture seemed more concrete to me.

It was around that time that I saw a poster advertising a design competition being run by the Container Corporation of America. The idea was to create a symbol to represent recycled paper. One of my college requirements had been a graphic design course so I thought I’d give it a go. It didn’t take me long to come up
with my design: only a day or two. (32) _____ I already had arrows and angles in my mind because on my course I’d done a presentation on recycling waste water. I’d come up with a graphic that described this process very simply.

The problem with the design I’d done earlier was that it seemed flat, two-dimensional. So when I sat down to enter the competition, I thought back to a field trip in elementary school to a newspaper office where we’d been shown how paper was fed over rollers as it was printed. (33) _____  The three arrows in it look like strips of folded-over paper. I drew them in pencil, and then traced over everything in black ink. These days, with computer graphics packages, it’s rare that designs are quite so plain. I think I found out I’d won the competition in a letter. Was I excited? Well, yes of course – but not that excited. (34) _____  So it just seemed like, of course I would win! There was a monetary prize, though for the life of me I can’t remember how much it was... about $2,000?

35 / 45

35. You will hear people talking in four different situations. For questions 35-38, choose the best answer (A, B or C).

 

You hear a young man talking about his hobby of rock climbing. How does he feel about it?

36 / 45

You will hear people talking in four different situations. For questions 35-38, choose the best answer (A, B or C).

 

36. You hear a public announcement at a family theme park. What does the announcement contain?

 

37 / 45

You will hear people talking in four different situations. For questions 35-38, choose the best answer (A, B or C).

 

37. You hear two people talking about a course they have attended. What was the topic of the course?

 

38 / 45

You will hear people talking in four different situations. For questions 35-38, choose the best answer (A, B or C).

 

38. You hear two people talking about a film they have both seen. What do they agree about?

 

39 / 45

You will hear a man called Chris Graham talking to a group of students about a vacation job he had in Australia.
For questions 39 – 42, complete the sentences with a word or short phrase.

39. Chris thinks the best place to find a job like he had is the (39) _____ .

40 / 45

You will hear a man called Chris Graham talking to a group of students about a vacation job he had in Australia.
For questions 39 – 42, complete the sentences with a word or short phrase.

40. Chris is studying (40) _____ at university.

41 / 45

You will hear a man called Chris Graham talking to a group of students about a vacation job he had in Australia.
For questions 39 – 42, complete the sentences with a word or short phrase.

41. For most of the time he was working for the travel company, Chris lived in a (41) _____ outside of the town.

 

42 / 45

You will hear a man called Chris Graham talking to a group of students about a vacation job he had in Australia.
For questions 39 – 42, complete the sentences with a word or short phrase.

42. Chris was often asked to go to a (42) _____ at the weekend.

43 / 45

43. You will hear three short extracts in which people are talking about happiness. For questions 43 – 45, choose from the list (A – E) what each person says happiness means to them. Use the letters only once. There are two extra letters which you do not need to use.

Speaker 1

44 / 45

44. You will hear three short extracts in which people are talking about happiness. For questions 43 – 45, choose from the list (A – E) what each person says happiness means to them. Use the letters only once. There are two extra letters which you do not need to use.

Speaker 2

45 / 45

45. You will hear three short extracts in which people are talking about happiness. For questions 43 – 45, choose from the list (A – E) what each person says happiness means to them. Use the letters only once. There are two extra letters which you do not need to use.

Speaker 3

Il tuo punteggio è

Il punteggio medio è 27%

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